Relax in the Hutongs With a Blissful Cup of Irish Coffee From Wild Child Coffee

Having opened three months ago, Wild Child Coffee in the Dongcheng hutongs thankfully missed the unending mess that was the Great Brickening, delivering us an experience more akin to a hint of spring among the ruins of its surrounding neighborhood.

That's because the founder of Wild Child Coffee got his start as a barista's apprentice, gradually working his way up over 10 years to become the owner of his own small coffee shop in the hutongs.

Walking into the cozy, wood and concrete venue, you'll feel like you're entering a friend’s home, with neat furnishings and friendly staff making Wild Child a strong contender for your go-to daily spot for joe.

Posters of movie stars like the late Leslie Cheung and a playlist of Cantonese pop demonstrate the owner’s obsession with '80s Hong Kong culture, whereas the minimalist menu is written in Chinese and English and features coffees that range from RMB 25-30, with hand-poured coffees costing the most at RMB 35. Though a little pricier than what we're used to at our local chain, Wild Child Coffee makes up for the extra price with some exquisite and delicate foam work added to each cup.

In need of something with a little extra kick, we opted for the zhongdu huanzhe (RMB 38, pictured above), literally "severe patient", a modified version of Irish coffee in that it switches cream in for a small cup of milk, giving it a richer and rounder feel that allowed the coffee notes and boozy aroma to shine. The cup came with a wallop of bitterness and a nicely balanced rich roasted flavor, thanks to the coffee beans having been hand-roasted by the owner.

Since they were out of tiramisu at the time, we opted for a slice of chocolate cheesecake (RMB 38) instead to accompany our afternoon treat. The cake did not disappoint as a suitable alternative thanks to its light mousse-like texture and a sprinkling of milk powder.

Overall, Wild Child Coffee presents those nearby with a relaxing hangout with just enough noise seeping in from the outside – a reminder of the vivid and frenetic nature of life in the hutongs – and represents another venue that is helping Beijing's beloved alleyways return to form.

Wild Child Coffee
Daily 10am-10pm. 28 Xiguan Hutong, Dongcheng District (158 1130 2699)
东城区细管胡同28

More stories by this author here.

Email: [email protected]
Twitter: @flyingfigure
Instagram: @flyingfigure

Photos: Tracy Wang

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EDM Heavyweight Deadmau5 to Play Gongti Club One Third, May 3

Get ready to strap on your mau5head and rush to the dancefloor, Beijing EDM fans, for Canadian electronica titan Deadmau5 is set to perform at One Third on May 3, a mere 10 days away.

The Gongti nightclub announced the set, organized by Live Nation, earlier this afternoon (Apr 23) via its official WeChat channel, and aside from plenty of colorful gifs and photos of the famed DJ and producer's signature oversized mouse headgear, the post also featured an official poster for the show (see below).

Making the announcement so shortly before the set is sure to surprise many fans, but they'll more than likely clear their calendars for it. That's of course because Deadmau5, real name Joel Zimmerman, has risen to the very upper echelon of dance music, thanks to hypnotic smash hits like "The Veldt", "Ghosts n' Stuff", and "Aural Psynapse". He's also been nominated for six Grammys.

Apart from his successes in terms of record sales and awards, Deadmau5's famed headgear and bombastic stage setups have also gained wide renown. Fans have been known to sport Mickey Mouse-esque mau5heads of their own at his shows, which of course can be cribbed off of Taobao if you've yet to acquire your own. For example, try this one for RMB 800 or this even gaudier golden one for RMB 1,400 and hope that they're delivered before the big day.

Deadmau5 is no stranger to China, having played Shanghai previously, but this will be his first Beijing show (which at time of writing had not yet been announced on his official website). He'll also hit up Shanghai on Apr 29 and 30 before moving through Asia and onto the US.

Deadmau5 will perform at One Third nightclub on May 3. Early bird tickets cost RMB 180. For more information and tickets, click here or scan the QR code on the poster above.

Photos: thissongissick, Taobao, Live Nation

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EDM Heavyweight Deadmau5 to Play Gongti Club One Third, May 3

Get ready to strap on your mau5head and rush to the dancefloor, Beijing EDM fans, for Canadian electronica titan Deadmau5 is set to perform at One Third on May 3, a mere 10 days away.

The Gongti nightclub announced the set, organized by Live Nation, earlier this afternoon (Apr 23) via its official WeChat channel, and aside from plenty of colorful gifs and photos of the famed DJ and producer's signature oversized mouse headgear, the post also featured an official poster for the show (see below).

Making the announcement so shortly before the set is sure to surprise many fans, but they'll more than likely clear their calendars for it. That's of course because Deadmau5, real name Joel Zimmerman, has risen to the very upper echelon of dance music, thanks to hypnotic smash hits like "The Veldt", "Ghosts n' Stuff", and "Aural Psynapse". He's also been nominated for six Grammys.

Apart from his successes in terms of record sales and awards, Deadmau5's famed headgear and bombastic stage setups have also gained wide renown. Fans have been known to sport Mickey Mouse-esque mau5heads of their own at his shows, which of course can be cribbed off of Taobao if you've yet to acquire your own. For example, try this one for RMB 800 or this even gaudier golden one for RMB 1,400 and hope that they're delivered before the big day.

Deadmau5 is no stranger to China, having played Shanghai previously, but this will be his first Beijing show (which at time of writing had not yet been announced on his official website). He'll also hit up Shanghai on Apr 29 and 30 before moving through Asia and onto the US.

Deadmau5 will perform at One Third nightclub on May 3. Early bird tickets cost RMB 180. For more information and tickets, click here or scan the QR code on the poster above.

Photos: thissongissick, Taobao, Live Nation

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Feel the Burn: Ci Dongwai Xiaoguan Sets Mouths of Fire With Spicy Crayfish and Chuanchuan Xiang

In the wake of TBJ's Hot & Spicy Festivalour fiery restaurant coverage continues with Feel the Burn, in which we look back at what our vendors brought to the event so as to make you sweat. Head to these individual chili-rife eateries to relive and maintain the burn.

If you're a loyal follower of our food blogs, you will likely be familiar with Ci Dongwai Xiaoguan (formerly Dongwai Xiaoguan). One of our go-to venues for the authentic Sichuan chuanchuan xiang (think malatang in hot pot broth), Ci Dongwai Xiaoguan has recently revamped the menu at their Dongzhimenwai-adjacent restaurant, adding a number of homestyle dishes like crayfish cooked in seven different ways, while keeping more popular dishes such as beef with chilies, poached chicken, and poached beef in chili oil.

Having quickly downed a bowl of crayfish in 13 spices, featuring numerous crayfish with tender and tight meat (a sign of good quality), we spoke to co-owner Liu Tao about his experience at our Hot & Spicy Festival.

What did you bring to our Hot & Spicy Fest?
Crayfish and chuanchuan xiang. I previously worked in Jiangsu for four years and found the crayfish there was better than the type found in Hunan, so when I came back to Beijing, I decided to open a restaurant that only sells hand-washed crayfish from Hongze Lake in Xuyi, Jiangsu province. As for the chuanchuan xiang, it is popular at our restaurant for its special broth which is made with Sichuan laoying tea, a balancing agent for the chili and peppercorn-laden broth.  

What spicy dishes do you sell in your restaurant?
Spicy crayfish, Sichuan chuanchuan xiang, spicy braised beef, and spicy frogs with ginger are the most popular dishes in our restaurant, and all feature recipes that use key ingredients from Sichuan.

What drink do you like to pair with spicy food?
Since spicy dishes have a strong influence on diners' taste buds, we provide suanmeitang, or sour prune juice. All the ingredients come from the time-honored traditional Chinese medicine drugstore, Tongrentang (同仁堂). Often iced, suanmeitang is full of smoked plum, rock sugar, osmanthus, hawthorns, orange peel, and licorice, and can easily ease the burning sensation on your tongue.

What's the hottest thing you've ever eaten?
I accidentally had a Sichuan bird's-eye chili once, and almost died.

In one word, how does eating spicy food make you feel?
Scratching my ears and head.

If what you're eating becomes way too hot, what do you use to cool off?
A lump of rock sugar should do the trick.

Can you handle more heat? Be sure to check out the latest issue of our Hot & Spicy themed magazine as well as our ongoing chili related restaurant coverage.

More stories by this author here.

Photos courtesy of Ci Dongwai Xiaoguan

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Feel the Burn: Ci Dongwai Xiaoguan Sets Mouths of Fire With Spicy Crayfish and Chuanchuan Xiang

In the wake of TBJ's Hot & Spicy Festivalour fiery restaurant coverage continues with Feel the Burn, in which we look back at what our vendors brought to the event so as to make you sweat. Head to these individual chili-rife eateries to relive and maintain the burn.

If you're a loyal follower of our food blogs, you will likely be familiar with Ci Dongwai Xiaoguan (formerly Dongwai Xiaoguan). One of our go-to venues for the authentic Sichuan chuanchuan xiang (think malatang in hot pot broth), Ci Dongwai Xiaoguan has recently revamped the menu at their Dongzhimenwai-adjacent restaurant, adding a number of homestyle dishes like crayfish cooked in seven different ways, while keeping more popular dishes such as beef with chilies, poached chicken, and poached beef in chili oil.

Having quickly downed a bowl of crayfish in 13 spices, featuring numerous crayfish with tender and tight meat (a sign of good quality), we spoke to co-owner Liu Tao about his experience at our Hot & Spicy Festival.

What did you bring to our Hot & Spicy Fest?
Crayfish and chuanchuan xiang. I previously worked in Jiangsu for four years and found the crayfish there was better than the type found in Hunan, so when I came back to Beijing, I decided to open a restaurant that only sells hand-washed crayfish from Hongze Lake in Xuyi, Jiangsu province. As for the chuanchuan xiang, it is popular at our restaurant for its special broth which is made with Sichuan laoying tea, a balancing agent for the chili and peppercorn-laden broth.  

What spicy dishes do you sell in your restaurant?
Spicy crayfish, Sichuan chuanchuan xiang, spicy braised beef, and spicy frogs with ginger are the most popular dishes in our restaurant, and all feature recipes that use key ingredients from Sichuan.

What drink do you like to pair with spicy food?
Since spicy dishes have a strong influence on diners' taste buds, we provide suanmeitang, or sour prune juice. All the ingredients come from the time-honored traditional Chinese medicine drugstore, Tongrentang (同仁堂). Often iced, suanmeitang is full of smoked plum, rock sugar, osmanthus, hawthorns, orange peel, and licorice, and can easily ease the burning sensation on your tongue.

What's the hottest thing you've ever eaten?
I accidentally had a Sichuan bird's-eye chili once, and almost died.

In one word, how does eating spicy food make you feel?
Scratching my ears and head.

If what you're eating becomes way too hot, what do you use to cool off?
A lump of rock sugar should do the trick.

Can you handle more heat? Be sure to check out the latest issue of our Hot & Spicy themed magazine as well as our ongoing chili related restaurant coverage.

More stories by this author here.

Photos courtesy of Ci Dongwai Xiaoguan

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Beijing’s Best Events That Won’t Leave You Hungover, Apr 23-29

Our Events Watch series aims to highlight happenings that aren't focused on alcohol and drinking, but instead take a more educational or productive approach. Events include comedy, talks, networking events, markets, and dinners.
 

Monday, Apr 23

24 Epic Solar Adventures Around China
Head to the Residence of the Embassy of Afghanistan at the beginning of the week for a journey through China's 24 solar terms, which were first mapped out nearly 3,000 years ago and are considered to be the country's "fifth great invention." Dominic Johnson-Hill of Plastered 8 fame has been traveling China for Xinhua as the host of a new television program to uncover how these 24 solar terms are ingrained in Chinese culture and history, including in the use of farming and harvesting. Johnson-Hill will now share some of his stories and pictures with the public. RMB 60, RMB 30 (students). 7.30pm. Residence of the Embassy of Afghanistan
 

Tuesday, Apr 24

Autonomy: Taking Ourselves Back
Beijing feminists are invited to the Bookworm for a night of discussion, performance, and wine this Tuesday. The talk will focus on ideas surrounding "autonomy" and the work of Kathy D'Arcy, who launched the project of the same name in Ireland in order to campaign towards a change in the country's strict abortion laws. This event is therefore geared to be a safe space to explore the true nature of bodily autonomy, and the consequences of women's private choices becoming the topic of public debate. RMB 50. 7.30pm. The Bookworm
 

Wednesday, Apr 25

Professional Development Series: Salary Negotiations
Having secured your dream job, how do you now go about getting the salary you deserve? Even if you're already employed, how do you convince your boss that you're worth more? According to the organizers of this event, statistics show that over 50 percent of individuals have never negotiated their salary, but the minority that do have a 75 percent success rate. Experts at the Beijing Women’s Network and JingJobs come together for this salary negotiation discussion to help you get the most out of your employment opportunities. RMB 60-90. 7-9.30pm. InnCube
 

Thursday, Apr 26

Ice Chiseling: The Art of Gong Chengyu
Artist Gong Chengyu exhibits his latest set of works, which have for the past two years seen him delve into notions of idols, worship, childhood, and mythology and how these are shaped by understandings of the "untouchable." These situations in which society creates its heroes, becomes the source of inspiration for Gong's latest paintings. RMB 10. Tue-Sun 10am-6pm. Hive Center for Contemporary Art
 

Friday, Apr 27

CandleX Dinner: Eat, Play, and Love
Join Beijing-based mental health group CandleX for this family-style dinner on Friday night at Guomao's Arcade by Hatchery. The event hopes to let attendees make friends, laugh, and get some stress off their chest with a healthy dose of Middle Eastern food followed by some bingo. All proceeds will go towards helping CandleX continue its twice-weekly support groups (read more on those here). RMB 160. 7-10pm. Arcade
 

Saturday, Apr 28

Tibetan Historical and Cultural Relics
This exhibition of Tibetan cultural and artistic relics and monastery items is the largest exhibition in China and displays many artifacts for the first time outside of Tibet. The exhibition will be divided into four parts: Tracing Civilizations, Tianlu Plateau, The Snowy Buddha, and One and the Same. Free (passport required). Tue-Sun 9am-5pm. Capital Museum
 

Sunday, Apr 29

Dining Out for the Center
Finally, Sunday presents another chance to stuff your face all in the name of a great cause – support of the Beijing LGBT Center. This month, the gang have chosen Dr. Sommer Cuisine as their hangout of choice, which is run by Dr. Sommer, a German-trained chef who makes medieval cuisine. RMB 188. 7-9.30pm. Dr. Sommer Cuisine

Looking for more great events this week? See everything that's happening via our Events page here.

Photos courtesy of the organizers, The Purple Fig

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Guardian Art Center: China’s Oldest Auction House Finds a Worthy Home in Ole Scheeren’s Latest Creation

Credited as being the first auction house to arise out of modern China, China Guardian’s new Büro Ole Scheeren custom-built headquarters in the heart of Beijing serves as an understated emblem of its growing stature at home and abroad. Located across from the National Art Museum of China (NAMOC), Scheeren’s two-volume glass and granite Guardian Art Center stands assured in its cultural understanding and makes for a worthy hub of exchange for some of China’s finest classical artworks.

As anyone who has walked a block in the capital knows, the city has in modern times favored utility over distinct aesthetics, a stance again renewed by president Xi Jinping’s attack on “weird buildings” in 2014 which went as far as to single out Scheeren’s striking and now decade-old CCTV Headquarters. To that end, the Guardian Art Center makes a conscious effort to incorporate design elements from Chinese art within the greater context of its surroundings.

The 14-story structure is deceptively compact and is divided by its two principal applications: a venue for the appreciation and sale of art, and a lifestyle center. The lower pixelated volume is comprised of the Guardian’s auction house, offices, and exhibition spaces, and its facade draws from its proximity – the low-lying hutongs – mirroring the gray hue, height-for-height scale, and earthy finish of Beijing’s antiquated but rapidly changing dwellings.

However, the center’s most distinct feature is its commanding upper volume, a suspended monolithic square ring of interlocking brick-like reflective glass panes that encircles the hotel’s inner courtyard. The innermost single loaded corridor connects the 120 boutique hotel rooms, and a number of restaurants and bars, affording views of the nearby Forbidden City and outer-lying mountains. As indicative of Guardian China’s clout, guests will also soon enjoy direct subway access to the complex via the yet-to-be-opened NAMOC stop.

With recent news of a collaboration between London’s Serpentine Gallery and Jiakun Architects to construct a pavilion in Beijing’s downtown Wangfujing, 2018 is proving an exciting time for art and architecture in the city. As an innovative example of a cultural institution yet to grace Beijing’s controlled structural landscape, the Guardian Art Center serves as a worthy monument to China’s growing influence in the art world. What’s more, the center also serves a reminder of what modern architecture can achieve when it successfully navigates the mercurial design of Chinese politics.

Guardian Art Center
Daily 10am-6pm. 1 Wangfujing Street, Dongcheng District
嘉德艺术中心:东城区王府井大街1号

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Email:
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Photos courtesy of Büro Ole Scheeren

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Morton’s Unveils New Seasonal Menu: From Refreshing Appetizers to Meaty Mains, Morton’s Delivers Once Again

Morton's of Chicago

Are you looking for the smell of spring to wake up your taste buds after the winter hibernation season? Or do you prefer to experience the joys of spring with your taste as the guiding sense? For those whose spring wishes revolve around tasting the best the season has to offer, the new 2018 spring menu at Morton's The Steakhouse is sure to see your wishes granted. Five new seasonal dishes will cater to all tastes, making Morton’s the place to truly enjoy the spring season.

Beginning with something cool, the Burrata, Grilled Asparagus, and Baby Heirloom Tomato Salad (RMB 218) is a vibrant celebration of flavor and texture. Packed with the season’s most tempting produce this dish is the perfect way to begin a meal.

An innovative addition to the grill comes in the form of the Bacon Steak with Peach Bourbon Glaze (RMB 108) – a thick cut of smoked pork belly that is prepared in the same manner as a traditional steak. Perfect as an appetizer or side dish, the impressive slabs are prepared with a peach-bourbon glaze for an extra dose of all-American flavor; an indulgent treat that is worth the extra few calories.

Moving onto the main course, two new steak additions steal the show. The 500g USDA Prime Dry Aged Bone-In Ribeye (RMB 998) is popular among customers thanks to its unique cut and the delicate contrast between the seared outside of the steak and its tender center. Meanwhile, the mild spicy butter sauce and unbelievably tender beef complement each other perfectly in the 210g Wagyu Filet Mignon with Fire Roasted Pepper and Jalapeño Butter (RMB 788, pictured at top), broadening the overall taste of the steak and bringing it to a new level.

Morton's The Steakhouse also offers delicious seafood main courses for those who are feeling a bit more ‘surf’ than ‘turf’. Morton's The Steakhouse offers Seared Halibut with Romesco Sauce (RMB 428). Rooted in Catalonia cuisine, the red sauce features roasted red peppers and almonds; a wonderful blend of sweet and earthy flavors.

Spring was made to be enjoyed over a glass of wine or two. For the new seasonal menu, Morton’s also provides guests with a sommelier recommendation of the Beaulieu Vineyard, Tapestry, Red Blend, Napa Valley, 2013. Coming from Napa Valley, one of the leading wine regions in the United States, this blended red wine contains notes of multiple spiced herbs, dried currants, and cedar, with a heavy bodied and lasting aftertaste – perfect for a fragrant spring evening. This fantastic wine can be enjoyed at RMB 1,188 as part of the seasonal menu.

These new dishes are sure to delight both regulars and new visitors alike. The new menu is available from Apr 17 for a limited time only. Advance reservations are highly recommended (all prices are subject to a 15 percent service charge).

This post was provided by Morton’s of Chicago
Photos courtesy of Morton’s of Chicago

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Meishiya’s Cheap Bento Boxes are a Quick and Easy Lunch Fix in Dongzhimen

“What do we eat for lunch?” your colleague asks casually, but anxiously. Your blood plumps and your breath gets faster, because you really don’t have a clue. C'mon, let’s face it: midday meals lead to so much mafan. Especially since you don’t want to go for a RMB 300 per person buffet (in my ragged T-shirt? Hell no!), and your wallet is getting flatter as payday still remains a few days off. Thankfully, Beijing has alternatives like Meishiya Bento, which don't require spending a lot of time or money.

Featuring 14 bentos, or Japanese style lunch sets (RMB 35-48), and three kinds of salads (RMB 20-25), Meishiya Bento is a popular lunch haunt in the basement of Raffles City, Dongzhimen. The bento-box options range from pork, salmon, beef, chicken, to curry. All are balanced out with vegetables, rice, soup, and pickles.

The beef burdock and tofu bento (RMB 38) lived up to its name with juicy slices of meat and bean curd. An added bonus: its rice was cooked with purple sweet potatoes. The only flaw was the lukewarm onside stirred lotus root and meat dish, though the side of miso soup was at least piping hot.

The café-style venue was a bit chaotic, in that you have to order and pay, grab a seat, and then return to pick up your food from the cashier when your number is called, meaning you might lose your seat. In our case, we ended up sitting at the counter facing a pile of fried chicken, which was not bad. Considering the price and quick convenience on offer, you could certainly do worse in a pinch than heading to Meishiya for lunch.

Meishiya Bento
Daily 10am-10pm. B1, Raffles City, 1 Dongzhimen Nandajie, Dongcheng District (8401 0989)
美希亚:东城区东直门南大街1号北京来福士B1

More stories by this author here.
Email: [email protected]
Twitter: @flyingfigure
Instagram: @flyingfigure

Photos: Tracy Wang

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Final Stop on the Great Brickening Shows Beijing Hutongs Have Become Sterile, Tepid Alleys

Last year, many of us were dismayed to witness a brutal urban rejuvenation campaign that dismantled many of our favorite Beijing hutong F&B establishments. Dubbed the "Great Brickening," the city-wide campaign took few prisoners as it rendered some place unrecognizable and shut others down.

At the time, the Beijinger posted a jarring before-and-after photo comparison, but because the enforced makeover was made to be compliant instead of aethetically pleasing, it may not have been a proper portrayal of how Beijing ideally wanted to look like.

READ: Beijing Hutong Culture Reaches Crisis Point as Fangjia Hutong Becomes Care Home

Now, almost a year later, a Beijing newspaper has proclaimed the city's urban rejuvenation campaign to be a success by posting its own before-and-after hutong photo comparison. And although its tone is celebratory and exuberant, hutong-nostalgic expats probably aren't as likely to share the feeling.

Underneath the headline "Old Beijing resident hutongs have returned," the Beijing Daily displayed through a series of photos that the new government-standard renovated hutongs have been duly stripped of their personality.

Mainly focusing upon the changes made to Beijing's Jingshan hutong neighborhood, the photo comparisons show the renovations to have eradicated commercial interests and personal flourishes from each example, reverting the hutong to a basic, non-descript wall.

But where expats and overseas tourists have enjoyed Beijing hutongs for their personality and charm, the report claims that the changes are best for everyone.

"Before, this hutong was very chaotic with souvenir sellers on both sides of the street and tourists passing through on three-wheeled bikes," elderly Jingshan hutong resident Zhang Junbo told the Beijing Daily. "It was so busy and frantic, it wasn't at all suitable for living in."

READ: Modernista Turns 6, Standing Tall as a "Great Brickening Survivor" With Gigs Aplenty Nov 10-12 and Nov 24-26

Now that the city had implemented its urban renewal campaign, things are much different for Zhang. "The hutong has been reverted to its clean and original state, just like how it was in my childhood memories. As well, tourists can now finally see the real Beijing."

Deputy director of the Jingshan local affairs unit Tian Guoming feels the same way. "By renovating the hutongs, we can strengthen local residents' sense of belonging as well as properly tell the story of Jingshan."  

In response to the story, some netizens have taken a contrary view.

READ: Can't Keep Me Down: The Tenacious Beijing Venues That Survived and Reopened After the Brickening

Describing it as "really ugly," one comment complained that "They tore down the real city wall and put up a fake one."

Others complained about the new hutong's sterile nature by writing comments like: "It looks cold and half-hearted," "There's no vitality," and "This is the 'authentic' old Beijing? As a native resident, I don't believe so!"

Another comment complained that authorities seem not to favor their own decisions. "Before they wanted to develop the local economy, but then the local culture died out as the economy improved," said one person. "Now they want to develop their culture again!"

READ: Cleaning Up Nice: City Bookstore Opens on Sanlitun's Formerly 'Dirty' Bar Street

Beijing's current urban renewal campaign focuses heavily upon culture and history by creating neo-classic versions of traditional architecture as well as building a plethora of book stores

Last September, a new tourist center that opened near the famous Silk Streets loudly proclaimed itself to be Beijing's "one stop" destination for tourists. Now that Beijing's hutongs all share the same lukewarm, homogeneous appearance, it really does seem as though tourists visiting Beijing won't have any reason to go anywhere else. 

More stories from this author here.

E-Mail: charlesliu1 (at) qq (dot) com
Twitter: @Sinopath

Images: Baijiaodao, Sohu, People's Daily

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