Next in the Great Wall Campaign: Wudaoying Hutong Takes a Hit, Invaded by Yellow-Hatted Men

In the latest rounds of bricking up the hutongs and shaking things up, Wudaoying Hutong seems to have taken a hit. The alleyway, popular with domestic tourists and international tourists alike, has undergone plenty of gentrification, and was the sight of much destruction this morning.

READ: Great Wall of Beijing: Find Out Which Businesses Survived Sanlitun's Recent Onslaught of Renovations  

We spoke to Victoria Yang, media director at Tube Station, who told us, "According to new [government] policies, privately owned properties can't be used for commercial purposes," Yang tells us.

The restaurants taking the biggest hit were those towards the west mouth of Wudaoying Hutong, near Andingmen Bridge. My favorite Shaanxi noodle place (nicknamed bathroom noodles because of its worryingly close proximity to the public toilets) was already shut down a few months ago, but potential reason for the closure was not clear, until now.

Yang confirms that most of the small streetside restaurants near the Andingmen Bridge are unlikely to have had full commercial licenses. One example is the Xianghe Roubing (香河肉饼) on the western side of Wudaoying, which according to Yang's colleagues, had already received warnings from authorities stating that it fell under the category of "unauthorized and undocumented housing" (违章建筑 wéizhāng jiànzhú), and therefore should not have been conducting business.

Pizza fans, don't worry, as Tube Station has full F&B licenses and won't be affected by this latest round of demolishing. Of the over 300 businesses around Wudaoying, Yang believes only approximately one third are fully licensed, meaning that we can expect the other two thirds to be demolished or shut down soon. 

"Following Chinese New Year, the public safety bureau, tax bureau, city police, and the police all came by to check and warn business owners of their plans; now, they are serious." And serious the yellow-hatted men are.

More stories by this author here.

Email: [email protected]
Instagram: s.xuagram

Photos: Victoria Yang

Top 10 Fake Myths About Food That You Should Know (Part 1)

If you've lived in Beijing long enough, you've probably heard the rumors that “fensi noodles and seaweed are made of plastic,” “eating crab and persimmon at the same time will poison you,” “pork blood and mu’er mushrooms can protect you from PM2.5.”

In an attempt to quell some of this ignorance and scaremongering, The Beijing News recently listed a number of the most prevalent and pervasive fake rumors that have spread across China in recent years. Of course, it pays to be vigilant and conscious of what you're putting in your body but it also pays to know when people are feeding you lies.

On that note, let's take a look at some debunked food rumors that have had China gripped with fear in the past few years.

Myth 1: Seafood + Vitamin C = Poison

Rumor: Last October, a number of websites shared the a story describing how “two women died from eating crabs and persimmons together.” Many people believe that eating seafood alongside a dose of vitamin C will poison you.

Fact: The only way in which you could be poisoned by eating seafood and vitamin C is if you ate several kilograms of arsenic-contaminated crabs as well as the equivalent of five kilograms of tomatoes, making it nearly impossible. “Vitamin C can transform pentavalent arsenic into trivalent arsenic under laboratory conditions, but it’s hard to replicate in normal conditions,” Zhu Yi, deputy professor at the College of Food Science at China Agricultural University, explains.

Myth 2: Pig's blood and mu’er fungus can protect you from PM2.5

Rumor: Pig's blood, thanks to the detoxifying plasma proteins held within, can absorb the toxins in your body and also undergo a chemical reaction with dust and metal particles, transforming them into non-absorbable material to be excreted through the digestive tract. Mu’er or wood ear funguson the other hand, performs a similar function for our lungs.

Fact: Theoretically, these foods can't cleanse your lungs. In traditional Chinese medicine books, the beneficial function of pig's blood, duck's blood, and mu’er has never outlined. But there is some research that shows that animal blood can affect the digestive tract and help absorb fewer poisonous materials from our food, and help it to excrete them. However, PM2.5 lodges itself in the bronchus of the lungs, and there is no solid proof that these foods can reach these areas or have an affect on them.

Myth 3:Eating poultry will give you bird flu

Rumor: Around Spring Festival of this year the following rumor did the rounds online: “Hao Aijun from Jiangxi Province ate dapanji  [a chicken dish from Xinjiang] at Wushijie restaurant and died after being infected by H7N9 (bird flu).” There were also other rumors on the Internet saying that after eating paojiao fengzhua [chicken feet with pickled chili] one person had become infected bird flu.

Fact: “The main way that people can be infected by the H7N9 virus is to be directly or indirectly exposed to an environment contaminated by infected birds, and there’s no proof that H7N9 virus can affect human beings through cooked meat,” explains the National Health and Family Planning Commission. Also, bird flu can’t be transmitted between human beings.

Myth 4: Eating pig’s trotters can improve your looks

Rumor: Eating pig's trotters will improve your looks.

Fact: “Collagen found in pig’s trotters is not made up of quality protein, and eating an egg or drinking a glass of milk is much better from the point of consuming protein,” Zhu Yi said. “If your body is healthy, and you have no issue digesting or sleeping, then your skin will naturally be glossy.”

Myth 5: Eating bracken will give you cancer

Rumor: In early 2008, there were rumors about bracken (a large, coarse fern) and bracken powder giving people stomach cancer.

Fact: “Whenever you see a rumor about a specific ingredient giving people cancer, don’t believe it, except for when it comes to smoking, which has been proven to increase the chances of getting lung cancer, throat cancer, and oral cancer. In order to get cancer from food you would have to constantly eat that same ingredient over a very long period of time. The human body can self-regulate, so there won’t be a big risk,” says Fan Zhijiang from the China Agricultural University.

So, we hope you learned something today and you should never be so quick to jump on the rumor-mongering bandwagon. Until part 2, eat health(il)y and wisely.

More stories by this author here.

Email: [email protected]
Twitter: @flyingfigure
Instagram: @flyingfigure

Photos: giphynipicBelarus, pighalle, gobotany, nicpic

On Yer Bike: Give Your Legs a Workout on One of Serk’s Weekend Rides

Top of the list of "things I always say I'll do but actually don't" is "get out of the city at the weekend" so despite my utter lack of cycling experience I jumped at the opportunity to join one of local cycling club Serk's weekend rides when they invited me along recently. 

Serk is a cycling club and boutique bike shop founded by Australian expat Shannon Bufton. As well as cycling tours of more far-flung destinations around China, they also organize weekly bike rides on the outskirts of Beijing. Recent rides have taken in Miyun Reservoir, the area around Mutianyu, and the back roads of Metougou. The rides meet at their shop just north of the Lama Temple and east of the south gate of Ditan Park, where you can stock up on supplies for your bike and fuel up with a coffee made by Shannon himself, before boarding a mini bus to the start of the route.

A one ride pass, including transport to and from the destination for you and your bike costs RMB 350 or you can purchase a 10 or 15-ride pass for RMB 2,500 or RMB 3,000, respectively. Alternatively, if you have your own transportation, you can purchase a cheaper self-ride pass for RMB 100 or RMB 800 for 15. Pay in cash on the day or via WeChat. 

You'll also need to have a fairly high quality road bike to take part in the rides – your cranky old Flying Pigeon won't cut it here – or you can rent a bike from Serk starting for RMB 250-450, depending on the quality and size of the bike. You can also rent a helmet for RMB 50. I was lent a super sexy lightweight titanium number that I was frankly loath to give back at the end of the ride.

The ride I joined took us to Pinggu, about an hour and half's drive northeast of the city center. Each ride is split into three groups: C, the easiest; B, for intermediate riders; and A, for serious cyclists. The length of the rides and the amount of hills involved vary, but as a rough guide, C group rides are usually around 50km with medium-intensity hills, B group rides are around 70km, and A group rides can be in excess of 100km with some challenging climbs. 

Not without some trepidation (since my previous cycling experience amounts to cycling to the supermarket and back) I joined the beginners group but any of my fears were quickly assuaged – the group is super supportive and you are free to set your own pace. Serk posts a more experienced rider at the front and back of the group so you needn't worry about getting left behind. I ended up finishing our 44km route in just over two hours, helped along enormously by the aforementioned sexy bike.

Serk have been running the rides for a few years now but there are a few updates for 2017. Firstly, they will be organizing regular "Blue Sky Rides" to take advantage of the best of Beijing's weather. Obviously, these won't always fall on a weekend but if you purchase a ride pass you can still use it for these rides, whenever they fall. Secondly, they will be implementing the "Serk Safe Track" system, which tracks your location using GPS through an app on your smartphone. The tool will help the Serk team locate you in case of an emergency, as well as allow you to track your location on the cycling route.

The next ride, this Saturday, March 25, will be in Huairou and will travel along Fanqi Lu (范崎路), one of the best cyling roads around according to the Serk team. More details about the ride can be found here

More stories by this author here.

Instagram: @gongbaobeijing
Twitter: @gongbaobeijing
Weibo: @宫保北京

Photos courtesy of Serk

‘Whale Rider’ Author Witi Ihimaera to Give Bookworm Talk, Mar 24

As the first published author of New Zealand's Māori Aboriginal minority, Witi Ihimaera has taken tales that are very specific to his culture and homeland and turned them into universally acclaimed, awardwinning works.

The 73-year-old author of books like Whale Rider – which was also adapted into a film of the same name – has long been praised for not only exploring his people's culture in his novels and short stories, but has also perhaps received even more fanfare for shedding light on complex and often contemporary Māori issues in those works. The film adaptation of Whale Rider, a heroines tail about a Māori girl engaged in a timeless tribal struggle against her narrow-minded grandfather, was not only critically acclaimed but also lead to its star, the then 13-year-old Keisha Castle-Hughes, to be the youngest nominee for the Academy Award for Best Actress.

The BBC called Ihimaera's book a "magical, lore-laden novel" but despite those successes, Ihimaera has also been dogged by criticism and controversy after a detractor accused him of plagiarizing passages of his book The Trowenna Sea in 2009. He apologized for the mistake and insisted it was unintentional, but it remained a stain on his reputation for years, prompting him to annotate his subsequent book, The Parihaka Woman "within an inch of its life" according to an unflinching profile of the author in Noted Magazine.

That article is a complex portrait of a flawed, multifaceted and endlessly fascinating author. If you want to learn even more about Ihimaera, you can listen to this interview about his the 2014 memoir, Māori Boy, in which he chronicles the first 15 years of his life. We hope that his talk at The Bookworm will be an equally frank and illuminating glimpse into the thinking of arguably New Zealand's best author.

Witi Ihimaera will be at The Bookworm on Friday March 24, 7.30pm. Admission is free. For more information click here. Our event listing for the talk is here.

More stories by this author here.

Email: [email protected]
Twitter: @MulKyle

Photo: Stuff.co.nz

‘Whale Rider’ Author Witi Ihimaera to Give Bookworm Talk, Mar 24

As the first published author of New Zealand's Māori Aboriginal minority, Witi Ihimaera has taken tales that are very specific to his culture and homeland and turned them into universally acclaimed, awardwinning works.

The 73-year-old author of books like Whale Rider – which was also adapted into a film of the same name – has long been praised for not only exploring his people's culture in his novels and short stories, but has also perhaps received even more fanfare for shedding light on complex and often contemporary Māori issues in those works. The film adaptation of Whale Rider, a heroines tail about a Māori girl engaged in a timeless tribal struggle against her narrow-minded grandfather, was not only critically acclaimed but also lead to its star, the then 13-year-old Keisha Castle-Hughes, to be the youngest nominee for the Academy Award for Best Actress.

The BBC called Ihimaera's book a "magical, lore-laden novel" but despite those successes, Ihimaera has also been dogged by criticism and controversy after a detractor accused him of plagiarizing passages of his book The Trowenna Sea in 2009. He apologized for the mistake and insisted it was unintentional, but it remained a stain on his reputation for years, prompting him to annotate his subsequent book, The Parihaka Woman "within an inch of its life" according to an unflinching profile of the author in Noted Magazine.

That article is a complex portrait of a flawed, multifaceted and endlessly fascinating author. If you want to learn even more about Ihimaera, you can listen to this interview about his the 2014 memoir, Māori Boy, in which he chronicles the first 15 years of his life. We hope that his talk at The Bookworm will be an equally frank and illuminating glimpse into the thinking of arguably New Zealand's best author.

Witi Ihimaera will be at The Bookworm on Friday March 24, 7.30pm. Admission is free. For more information click here. Our event listing for the talk is here.

More stories by this author here.

Email: [email protected]
Twitter: @MulKyle

Photo: Stuff.co.nz

A Drink With: Amy Daml Founding Member and Contributor to China Art Aggregator Website Loreli

We recently caught up with Amy Daml, co-creator of the art aggregator website Loreli (WeChat ID: loreli-china) which compiles some of the best written, visual, and recorded arts from across the country and often features in-depth interviews with the artists behind them.

You can catch Daml and the Loreli crew at their fourth Affordable Art Market this Sunday, March 26, and keep an eye out for a photography contest in the coming months.

Tell us a bit about yourself. What brought you to this beautiful and hazy part of the world?
I’m Amy! I came to Beijing to spend a year being a radio host at China Radio International (CRI). That was five years ago. Since then, I’ve not only hosted radio shows and podcasts, I’ve also been a writer, a voice actor, a softball player, an occasional drunk, and most recently I started a website devoted to most of those things.

How was Loreli conceived? When did you all meet up?
It was June of 2015 that Hannah Lincoln, Kerryn Leitch, and I first met at Hot Cat Club. We didn’t really expect something like Loreli to come out of that meeting, but we knew that we wanted to do some kind of creative project together. After talking about the need for more voices in the arts scene here, we decided to be the ones to try to open up that platform. We have added several more Loreli curators since then: Angela Li, Max Berwald, Daniel Rothwell, and Deva Eveland.

Is there a favorite spot of yours and the Loreli crew to hit up? Why?
Despite the fact that it is a terrible place to get work done because all of our friends hang out there and the cocktails are too damn delicious, we always seem to have our Loreli meetings at Más. I guess it’s pretty good motivation to get work done quickly so we can get on with the drinking.

What’s the worst drinking experience you’ve had in Beijing?
Ugh. I had absinthe for the first time at Modernista and didn’t know how to take it, so we drank it straight with no sugar or water. Ten minutes later it hit us all like a ton of bricks. I got in a fight with my friend, started crying, and got super lost trying to get home.

If you could choose anyone living or passed to be your drinking buddy for the night who would it be?
Well, I read that the Queen Mother had eight drinks a day, lived to 101, and was adored by the British public. I admire anyone who can day drink adventurously and still get shit done. I would like to learn her secret.

What do you think is missing from Beijing’s nightlife scene? What do you enjoy about it?
To-go cocktails! While I have been known to dabao a cocktail every now and then, there’s like no McDonald’s of cocktails ... although when I phrase it that way it sounds pretty disgusting.

If you got lost in the Gobi desert for four days and you returned to Beijing parched and desperate for liquid, which specific drink (and bar) would be your choice to recuperate?
I would most definitely have to stop in to Arrow Factory and get a Seeing Double IPA, as I assume that would cancel out the double vision I would undoubtedly have from dehydration. Then I would head to Temple to dance to some local rock bands until I was dehydrated again.

Stay up-to-date with all the team’s events and content via the Loreli website (loreli-china.com) or subscribe to their WeChat account (ID: loreli-china) by scanning the QR code below.

This article originally appeared in the March/April 2017 edition of the Beijinger.

Photo: Hannah Lincoln

A Drink With: Amy Daml Founding Member and Contributor to China Art Aggregator Website Loreli

We recently caught up with Amy Daml, co-creator of the art aggregator website Loreli (WeChat ID: loreli-china) which compiles some of the best written, visual, and recorded arts from across the country and often features in-depth interviews with the artists behind them.

You can catch Daml and the Loreli crew at their fourth Affordable Art Market this Sunday, March 26, and keep an eye out for a photography contest in the coming months.

Tell us a bit about yourself. What brought you to this beautiful and hazy part of the world?
I’m Amy! I came to Beijing to spend a year being a radio host at China Radio International (CRI). That was five years ago. Since then, I’ve not only hosted radio shows and podcasts, I’ve also been a writer, a voice actor, a softball player, an occasional drunk, and most recently I started a website devoted to most of those things.

How was Loreli conceived? When did you all meet up?
It was June of 2015 that Hannah Lincoln, Kerryn Leitch, and I first met at Hot Cat Club. We didn’t really expect something like Loreli to come out of that meeting, but we knew that we wanted to do some kind of creative project together. After talking about the need for more voices in the arts scene here, we decided to be the ones to try to open up that platform. We have added several more Loreli curators since then: Angela Li, Max Berwald, Daniel Rothwell, and Deva Eveland.

Is there a favorite spot of yours and the Loreli crew to hit up? Why?
Despite the fact that it is a terrible place to get work done because all of our friends hang out there and the cocktails are too damn delicious, we always seem to have our Loreli meetings at Más. I guess it’s pretty good motivation to get work done quickly so we can get on with the drinking.

What’s the worst drinking experience you’ve had in Beijing?
Ugh. I had absinthe for the first time at Modernista and didn’t know how to take it, so we drank it straight with no sugar or water. Ten minutes later it hit us all like a ton of bricks. I got in a fight with my friend, started crying, and got super lost trying to get home.

If you could choose anyone living or passed to be your drinking buddy for the night who would it be?
Well, I read that the Queen Mother had eight drinks a day, lived to 101, and was adored by the British public. I admire anyone who can day drink adventurously and still get shit done. I would like to learn her secret.

What do you think is missing from Beijing’s nightlife scene? What do you enjoy about it?
To-go cocktails! While I have been known to dabao a cocktail every now and then, there’s like no McDonald’s of cocktails ... although when I phrase it that way it sounds pretty disgusting.

If you got lost in the Gobi desert for four days and you returned to Beijing parched and desperate for liquid, which specific drink (and bar) would be your choice to recuperate?
I would most definitely have to stop in to Arrow Factory and get a Seeing Double IPA, as I assume that would cancel out the double vision I would undoubtedly have from dehydration. Then I would head to Temple to dance to some local rock bands until I was dehydrated again.

Stay up-to-date with all the team’s events and content via the Loreli website (loreli-china.com) or subscribe to their WeChat account (ID: loreli-china) by scanning the QR code below.

This article originally appeared in the March/April 2017 edition of the Beijinger.

Photo: Hannah Lincoln

Serbian Director Emir Kusturica to Headline Beijing Film Festival ‘One Belt, One Road’ Section

This post comes courtesy of our content partners at China Film Insider.

Maverick Serbian filmmaker Emir Kusturica will headline the “One Belt, One Road” section of the this year’s Beijing International Film Festival, it was announced Tuesday.

The news of the inclusion of Kustrica’s On the Milky Road in the festival comes almost a year after the two-time Cannes Palme d’Or winner claimed he was snubbed by the Cannes film festival over his support for the Russian president, Vladimir Putin.

In comments made public by The Hollywood Reporter at the time, Kustrica told the Russian News Service that “politics has more and more often interfered with the way the Cannes film festival works” and that he suspected “someone gave an order that my film shouldn’t be accepted.”

READ: Danish Filmmaker Bille August to Chair Beijing Film Festival Competition Jury (via China Film Insider)

Cannes said the film was rejected because it was submitted a day after the deadline. In October, the director, actor, and musician was given a Russian “Friendship” award via a decree signed by Putin.

Kusturica, 62, directed On the Milky Road and stars in it as a milkman who falls for a beautiful Italian-Serb woman played by Monica Bellucci during the Yugoslav civil war. The film went on to premiere at the Bridge of Arts festival in the southern Russian city of Rostov-on-Don last August.

The “One Belt, One Road” section of the Beijing International Film Festival is for films from countries Beijing hopes to involve in its much-vaunted trade outreach initiative, which seeks to revive business along ancient Silk Road trade routes.

The high-profile strategic initiative launched by the Chinese president has also become a key part of Beijing’s soft power push with multiple films centering on it getting the green light and the announcement last year of a new USD 2 billion film studio and theme park complex in the southwest city of Chongqing based on the political initiative.

Earlier this year critics slammed Jackie Chan’s recent film Kung Fu Yoga for featuring an Indian character in it heaped praise on the project, calling it “brazen political propaganda.”

READ: Samuel L. Jackson Returns to Beijing, Eats All of the Things

Other films featuring in the OBOR section include Macedonian drama film The Liberation of Skopje, Iranian domestic drama The Salesman, Filipino drama film Ma’ Rosa, and Indian psychological thriller film Raman Raghav 2.0.

The seventh edition of the state-run event will be held April 16-23.

Photo: ytimg.com

Beijing Beats: thruoutin EP Release, Reggae Sistas, Natural Flavor, Disco’Wine, Club Paradise

Beijing Beats brings you the best in Beijing nightlife each weekend so that you can soothe the woes of a long a stressful week with some out-of-body gyrating and some experiences you'd rather forget come Monday. Check the weekend's full list of nightlife events here.

Thursday, March 23

Throwback Thursday
Spend your Thursday at Pop-Up Beijing, where the happy hour is all day long and premium wines cost a mere RMB 40 per glass. Relax and enjoy your almost-weekend with Throwback Thursday. 6-11pm. Free. Pop-Up Beijing

Ran Music presents thruoutin (pictured at top)
Beijing-based American producer thruoutin teams up with Ran Music to release his brand new 2017 EP Contingent of Outlying Territory, which includes eight tracks written over the past year with influences ranging from Chicago footwork, UK bass, and field recording experimentation. To support the release, thruoutin will perform the entire EP live with the help of special guests, adding instrumentation along the way. Price TBC. 10pm-late. Dada


Friday, March 24

Reggae Sistas
The Reggae Sistas consists of five female reggae artists who incorporate jazz and R&B into their music and originate from across Asia. DJs Cyalda and Aivilox will also play alongside with DJ Raddam Ras. RMB 100, RMB 80 (advance). 8.30pm-midnight. Modernsky Lab

Natural Flavor
DJ Nasty Ray and his crew will spin old-school hip-hop jams as well as classic funk, soul, and reggae this Friday night at Migas, taking you back to the good old days of slow head-bobbing grooves. Price TBC. 10pm-late. Migas.

Flash Friday
8-Bit holds their first ever Flash Friday event, with DJs Chief and McCloud will play remixes of off-beat 70’s punk while the happy hour drinks get cheaper and cheaper from 6pm onwards, including RMB 25 for red or white wine, RMB 35 for cocktails, and only RMB 20 for a plethora of shots. Free. 6pm-2am. 8-Bit.


Saturday, March 25

Disco’Wine
Drink cheap wine and listen to good music this Saturday at Disco’Wine. DJs Eva Xu and Peter Stone will play your favorite songs for a night to remember (or forget) with the help of imported wines from Bordeaux, France for only RMB 30-35 per glass. Free. 8.30pm-late. Fubar

Club Paradise
Come enjoy paradise on a cold Beijing night with Club Paradise's funk and tropical-minded DJs Ted Dancin’, Saucy, and Chloe. Hawaiian shirts recommended; the cheesier the better. All you need to do is sip a tropical drink on 8-Bit's rooftop and let the good vibes do the rest. Free. 10pm-3am. 8-Bit

For full nightlife listings for the weekend, check our events section here.

Images courtesy of the organizers, thruoutin

Beijing Beats: thruoutin EP Release, Reggae Sistas, Natural Flavor, Disco’Wine, Club Paradise

Beijing Beats brings you the best in Beijing nightlife each weekend so that you can soothe the woes of a long a stressful week with some out-of-body gyrating and some experiences you'd rather forget come Monday. Check the weekend's full list of nightlife events here.

Thursday, March 23

Throwback Thursday
Spend your Thursday at Pop-Up Beijing, where the happy hour is all day long and premium wines cost a mere RMB 40 per glass. Relax and enjoy your almost-weekend with Throwback Thursday. 6-11pm. Free. Pop-Up Beijing

Ran Music presents thruoutin (pictured at top)
Beijing-based American producer thruoutin teams up with Ran Music to release his brand new 2017 EP Contingent of Outlying Territory, which includes eight tracks written over the past year with influences ranging from Chicago footwork, UK bass, and field recording experimentation. To support the release, thruoutin will perform the entire EP live with the help of special guests, adding instrumentation along the way. Price TBC. 10pm-late. Dada


Friday, March 24

Reggae Sistas
The Reggae Sistas consists of five female reggae artists who incorporate jazz and R&B into their music and originate from across Asia. DJs Cyalda and Aivilox will also play alongside with DJ Raddam Ras. RMB 100, RMB 80 (advance). 8.30pm-midnight. Modernsky Lab

Natural Flavor
DJ Nasty Ray and his crew will spin old-school hip-hop jams as well as classic funk, soul, and reggae this Friday night at Migas, taking you back to the good old days of slow head-bobbing grooves. Price TBC. 10pm-late. Migas.

Flash Friday
8-Bit holds their first ever Flash Friday event, with DJs Chief and McCloud will play remixes of off-beat 70’s punk while the happy hour drinks get cheaper and cheaper from 6pm onwards, including RMB 25 for red or white wine, RMB 35 for cocktails, and only RMB 20 for a plethora of shots. Free. 6pm-2am. 8-Bit.


Saturday, March 25

Disco’Wine
Drink cheap wine and listen to good music this Saturday at Disco’Wine. DJs Eva Xu and Peter Stone will play your favorite songs for a night to remember (or forget) with the help of imported wines from Bordeaux, France for only RMB 30-35 per glass. Free. 8.30pm-late. Fubar

Club Paradise
Come enjoy paradise on a cold Beijing night with Club Paradise's funk and tropical-minded DJs Ted Dancin’, Saucy, and Chloe. Hawaiian shirts recommended; the cheesier the better. All you need to do is sip a tropical drink on 8-Bit's rooftop and let the good vibes do the rest. Free. 10pm-3am. 8-Bit

For full nightlife listings for the weekend, check our events section here.

Images courtesy of the organizers, thruoutin